the review of the film with Lady Gaga

Ridley Scott’s House of Gucci with Lady Gaga, Adam Driver, Al Pacino, Jeremy Irons (film, theaters December 16)

As the baroness of Sorrentino’s film would say, this film is a huge baron. But since you can enjoy yourself to a certain extent by seeing the Boers, I’m reviewing it anyway.

Facts: Maurizio Gucci was shot dead in Milan on March 27, 1995 at the entrance to a building where one of his company offices was located. I remember that morning I was in the office of the newspaper where I worked at the time. We thought of a new wave of terrorism, a clumsy kidnapping attempt, a madman like Marc Chapman, the man who killed John Lennon. None of this. Soon it was learned that the killer’s hand had been armed by the ex-wife Patrizia Reggiani, always for jewelry, daughter of an industrialist, with the danée, but without the “change”, the rest that cannot be bought: the surname, the relations and the mischievousness of the really rich. She had remedied by marrying Maurizio, but when he left her, she was even more frightened than she already was. Criminal conduct proven by the investigation. Arrests, trials, convictions follow.

It was a very visible media crime and told in the most sloppy terms ever (the papers were full of terms like dark lady to define Patrizia) because Maurizio was the son of Rodolfo, Aldo’s nephew, in short, he was part of that dynasty , famous for scarves, handbags and financial problems. Gucci lends itself to the idea of ​​the saga that “even the rich cry,” but above all, even the rich hate each other. And the idea of ​​an ex-wife recruiting killers in league with a fortune teller (!) is a reality beyond the imagination of the worst mystery writer. Understandably, this story has produced many books and countless articles over the years and now even a film directed by a high caliber director.

According to Ridley Scott, Rodolfo Gucci lived in Villa Necchi (perhaps he is crossover with I am the love by Luca Guadagnino). Maurizio’s death takes place in Rome (it is not clear why). The Milanese setting of the eighties, which perhaps a Ryan Murphy series would have given breath of a story, is thrown away, one cliché after another. In the original version, the (Italian) characters played by English-speaking actors speak to each other in English, but with varying accents right from the Corleone part Godfather to Lithuanian carers, which is very annoying, but if you watch the dubbed version, you will be spared. What you will not be spared is that when Patrizia and Maurizio make love, you can feel it Let us free from Traviata. What would Ridley Scott tell us? That she is Violetta, she misleads him but loves him? Or maybe they listen to Giuseppe Verdi when the Italians get into it? The text returns to another parent scene: the arrival of the Guardia di Finanza at the Gucci house. A few notes from Magpie by Rossini and is immediately a comic opera.

Lady Gaga, who plays Patrizia, is a great actress and believes in what she does. She believes it to the point of going on talk shows around the world to say that Reggiani may have made a mistake, but it’s the company’s fault that instilled in her that she had to marry a rich man, it’s the fault of the gucci snobs who don’t have it. never accepted. Nonsense. Patrizia is a borderline, pathological case of a delusion of omnipotence. There can be no mitigating circumstances, either in the name of feminism or the class struggle. You can make movies about the killers, and you can even try to understand the motivations of the killers, but this, unsurprisingly, only happens in movies that really work. Not here. The other interpreters, all of great fame, are there for cachet, they are very bored, especially Jeremy Irons and Adam Driver, still fresh from enjoying their holiday in Italy. Thank you anyway for coming to visit us, you will have the gratitude of the tourism bodies.

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