Sansepolcro, an important altarpiece from the sixteenth century, will be returned to the cathedral

An important sixteenth-century altarpiece by Durante Alberti, which has been absent from the church since 1859 and is now in a private collection, will be returned to the Cathedral of Sansepolcro. The refund on the occasion of the next Antiques Biennale in Florence.

It will be returned to Cathedral from Sansepolcro (Arezzo) a magnificent altarpiece of Under Alberti (Sansepolcro, 1538 – Rome, 1613), built in 1582 for the Aretini family (or Artini family chapel): this is The Trinity and Saints Andreas, Mary Magdalene and Christina (oil on canvas, 373 x 192.5 cm), which is donated to the Cathedral per. Eleonora and Bruno Botticelli and from Fabrizio Moretti on the occasion of the 32nd edition of Florence International Biennale. The church will therefore receive compensation for a previous serious loss. The donation should commemorate the memory of the donors’ parents, namely Veria and Franco Botticelli and Alfredo Moretti.

The work best represents the pictorial qualities of Durante Alberti, a native Sansepolcro and belongs to a dynasty of artists. His father was the Roman carver, called Nero, author of wooden statues and furnishings. In the church, after more than a century and a half, the work will be placed next to another refined painting made by Durante Alberti for the cathedral of Borgo and still present in the church, the altarpiece depictingWorship of the shepherds made for the Pichi Chapel.

“This donation, in addition to connecting the memory of our parents with the return of an important work for the Cathedral of Sansepolcro”, confirms Fabrizio Moretti And Bruno Botticelli“Is meant to be a significant gesture of devotion from our families to our country’s cultural heritage, of relaxation and positivity in the difficult moments and misunderstandings between the public and private sectors. It is also a gesture that seals our friendship, was born in the mid – nineties between the walls of the stands at the Assisi Antiques exhibition and has survived to this day.We have chosen this very moment where we have two important positions in our sector, respectively as Secretary General of BIAF and as President of Antiquari d’Italia.

Under Alberti, who was long active in Rome and Lazio, joining the ranks of Counter-Reformed painters tasked with decorating the altars of the Counter-Reformation churches, he performed works of serious spiritual surroundings, especially because of the attendance of the Capuchin Order, which he worked for several times. In the Trinity and the Saints Andrea, Maria Maddalena and Cristina, where the figures in the foreground stand out against the background of classical architecture, we can also recognize influences from Venetian painters, filtered through baroque atmospheres. The Ancona, as mentioned above, was made for Chapel of the Aretini family, or Artini, dedicated to Saints Andrea, Maria Maddalena and Cristina, who leaned against the left wall of the Sansepolcro Cathedral. The work, mentioned during the pastoral visit of Bishop Niccolò Tornabuoni to the church in 1582, was sold by the Sansepolcro Cathedral in 1859 during a rearrangement of the church, which involved the removal of thirteen altars. It then became part of the collection of the Lilloni Alberti family, descendants of the dynasty of bourgeois artists. Due to its large size, the canvas was at that time divided into two fragments, one with the Trinity and the other with Saints Andreas, Mary Magdalene and Christina. The two fragments were purchased at an auction in 2002 and properly restored and reunited by the current owners.

Pictured: the altarpiece by Durante Alberti and the Sansepolcro Cathedral.

Sansepolcro, sar
Sansepolcro, an important altarpiece from the sixteenth century, will be returned to the cathedral

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