With room for 55, the European Parliament will vote to block 2035 petrol and diesel

The revolution began: with 339 votes in favor, 249 against and 24 abstentionsThe European Parliament yesterday approved the European Commission’s proposal ban the production and sale of cars with internal combustion engines from 2035 onwards. From that year onwards all cars produced and sold in Europe they must be zero-emission. In other words, electric.

Yesterday’s vote falls – along with many other initiatives – within plan against climate changecalled “Fit for 55” (literally “ready for 55”), which ensures a 15% reduction in pollutant emissions from the transport and automotive world by 2025, 55% in 2030 (compared to 1990 levels), up to 100% forecast for 2035.



Electric cars vs petrol and diesel cars: are they really green?

THIS IS ONLY THE START Yesterday’s vote is not final, but it will work as basis for negotiations with the Council of Europe, the body representing the governments of the 27 EU countries from which the actual legislative measures will then be derived. Some MEPs had proposed easing the proposal with a target of 90% reduction in CO2 emissions by 2035 instead of 100%which would have allowed the houses to work further e-fuel and alternative fuels. A corrective also supported by the Minister for Ecological Transformation Roberto Cingolaniwhich was rejected in the courtroom.


Hybrid sports cars: fall in love with a supercar like the Ferrari 296 GTB

Hybrid sports cars: fall in love with a supercar like the Ferrari 296 GTB

Thus, a change was defined that moves the adjustment date for small producers forward by six years, from 2030 to 2036 of cars (from one thousand to 10 thousand units per year) and vans (from one thousand to 22 thousand). A standard that aims to give a little bit of breathe to the homes of the Italian Motor Valleyproposed by Forza Italia and Fratelli d’Italia, and also supported in a bipartisan manner by the PD and the Lega (M5S abstained).

The one who was voted yesterday is one mandatory step, but not yet binding or final. Nothing has come into force yet: At the end of June, negotiations and the negotiation phase will begin with the Council of the European Union, in which the governments of the individual Member States will also participate, from which the actual measures at national level will then be deduced. In these negotiations, the main focus will be on incentives And infrastructure.


Green Michelin star: Electric cars for sustainability, but not only

Green Michelin star: Electric cars for sustainability, but not only

THE IMPACT ON ECONOMY 2035 is not tomorrow, but it’s not that far away either: there are only 13 years left, which is not a long time for a large sector like the automotive industry. Stopping cars with internal combustion engines will force you to start major conversion processes. However, the European Union’s decision does not come like a bolt from the blue and finds no one unprepared: housing has long since begun to move in this directionand almost all of them have already announced plans for full electricity conversion of its range.


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There European Automobile Manufacturers Association (ACEA)the trade association of car manufacturers, welcome European Parliament resolution to uphold the European Commission’s proposal on the targets for 2025 and 2030. “It is a goal in itself very demanding and it can only be achieved with one a huge effort to create charging infrastructures”, Warns the association in a note. Adding it “the transformation of this sector it depends on many external factors, many of which are beyond our reach. For this reason, ACEA is concerned about the decision to approve a 100% reduction in CO2 emissions by 2035“.


Mazda and the e-Fuel Alliance

Mazda and the e-Fuel Alliance

The car industry will fully contribute to the goal of achieving a CO2-neutral Europe by 2050. The entire industry is engaged in a huge effort against the conversion to electric cars, with the ongoing arrival of new modelswhich reflects customers’ wishes and leads us towards sustainable mobility“, he has declared Oliver Zipse, President of ACEA and CEO of BMW. “But given the volatility and uncertainty we are experiencing today, globally, any legislation or regulation that goes beyond the current decade is premature. Halfway through the process, there is rather a need for a transparent review of the next steps so that together we can decide what to do after 2030. Such a review should verify whether the collection and the availability of raw materials for batteries they will ensure the growth and sustainability of the electric car marketFinally, Zipse does not forget, among other things alternative fuels: “it will also be important to focus on the other conditions necessary to achieve the zero emission target. ACEA asks lawmakers to consider all the different aspects of Fit for 55, in particular the regulatory package for alternative fuels – in one coherent package“.

If the emission package went quite painlessly, The European Parliament, on the other hand, is divided over the reform of the emissions trading systemthe so-called ETS (Emission trading system), which then returns to the Committee on the Environment, Public Health and Consumer Policy for a new wording and subsequent vote. In the video below you will find one brief but effective explanation how ETS quotas work.

To simplify: the ETS is one of the most important measures taken by the EU combats emissions of polluting gases in industrial sectors which has a greater impact on climate change. In fact, since 2005, the ETS has defined one ceiling on the total emissions from about 11 thousand power plants and industries across Europe and build a market that enables these companies swap allowances for emissions, so that those who pollute more can buy shares of those who pollute less. The mechanism works due to the maximum ceiling decreases from year to year. The European Parliament’s proposal provides for extend it to virtually all the units responsible for polluting emissions (currently it covers about 40% of those generated), and thus includes the transport sector and domestic heating.


Contamination and coronavirus

Contamination and coronavirus

STOP ALSO AT CBAM The rejection of the ETS reform also led to suspension of the vote on the so-called “carbon tax”that Carbon limit adjustment mechanism (CBAM), a mechanism that will force international companies – engaged in highly polluting sectors – to a pay for the emissions they generate to import into Europe. A kind of duty imposed for protect European companies (which have to pay the costs of complying with environmental requirements) from possible unfair competition of companies operating in countries where environmental requirements are less stringent and which could therefore take lower prices.


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