The strangest games for kids: gun games, medieval escapes, and cryptic challenges

If you grew up in the 80s and 90s, you will probably remember spending most of your childhood watching CBBC, CITV or Nickelodeon, spending countless hours watching kids get slim and hiding under the duvet watching goosebumps. .

Children’s games were the perfect excuse to skip homework and watch the kids win great prizes like Pogo balls and big money.

We have all our favorites, from Jungle Run, which saw kids tackle obstacle courses through the ruins of an ancient temple, to 90s fun that pitted two schools against each other like 50/50.

Over the years, children’s games have become more and more strange and crazy. Let’s take a look at some of the weirdest children’s games of the past.

Splattetto

This medieval-themed game show first aired in the UK in 2011

This medieval-themed game show first aired in the UK in 2011

This medieval-themed game show first aired in the UK in 2011 with Jason Agnew and Matt Chin as hosts.

The show’s theme has often been dubbed a medieval version of Total Wipeout for Kids and was inspired by a strange mix of punk and rave fashion.

Spectators watched 12 children take on a large and extreme obstacle course and compete in three rounds of competition, including Cross the Moat, Ditch the Dungeon and Capture the Crown.

The winning attacker is crowned king or queen of Splatalot

The winning attacker is crowned king or queen of Splatalot

The 12 participants, known as the invaders, would meet a team of nine medieval-themed gladiators, who are tasked with protecting the castle from invaders.

The winning attacker is crowned king or queen of Splatalot.

This king or queen was then able to choose an attacker to punish in one of several ways, such as throwing him into the water with a catapult.

Horrible story: bloody games

Children face quizzes or physical challenges based on a specific point in history

Children face quizzes or physical challenges based on a specific point in history

Kids from the early 90s will remember this quiz-filled quiz game that saw kids excited about taking quizzes or physical challenges based on a particular era in history.

The show was led by comedian Dave Lamb and Rattus Rattus, a puppet plague rat, where the losing team was hit by pushing the time slider down into a puddle of smelly brown liquid.

The show, which was a spin-off of the popular children’s sketch comedy Horrible Stories, was so popular that it was adapted into an iOS / Android app so players could play with contestants.

In 2013, the show was nominated for a BAFTA Children’s Award in the Entertainment category.

50/50

This classic 90s game show was the ultimate after-school show that pitched two schools against each other

This classic 90s game show was the ultimate after-school show that pitted two schools against each other in games with skills, strategy and athletics.

Children could not wait to see their city represented and screamed at the TV when someone stumbled over an obstacle or fell into a trap.

Physical games usually consisted of inflatable obstacle courses where children jumped up on a giant, rocky, inflatable round table with a giant ball hung over them.

Participants also took on quiz challenges and observation rounds with a pop music video.

The winning team won an award for their school and in subsequent series a glass trophy.

Legends about the hidden temple

During the final temple challenge, children collect mysterious rewards, which turn out to be things like cameras and game consoles.

During the final temple challenge, children collect mysterious rewards, which turn out to be things like cameras and game consoles.

This Nickelodeon classic combines action and adventure while children occupy the temple filled with lost treasures protected by the mysterious Mayan temple guards.

Hosted by Kirk Fogg and Dee Baker, six teams of two children compete to reclaim one of the temple’s historical artifacts by performing physical stunts and answering questions based on history, mythology and geography.

Competitors who practiced had to compete in several physical activities, including rope climbing and running, as well as a written test.

During the final temple challenge, children collect mysterious rewards, which turn out to be things like cameras and game consoles.

Escape from Scorpion Island

Spectators watched the kids take up challenges to win bonuses that would help them escape the island they were trapped on.

Spectators watched the kids take up challenges to win bonuses that would help them escape the island they were trapped on.

This BBC children’s adventure TV show had its own unique twist as it brought a story that continued throughout the season.

Spectators watched the kids take up challenges to win bonuses that would help them escape the island they were trapped on.

The one who won the last challenge escaped the island while the losing team was left behind.

The show was filmed in a number of different locations, and each series introduced different challenges and stories.

The challenges were usually a mix of both mental and physical challenges, including rappelling from a rock

The challenges were usually a mix of both mental and physical challenges, including rappelling from a rock

Challenges were usually a mix of both mental and physical challenges, including carrying certain objects from one area to another while hovering in the air on cables, rappelling from a cliff or cliff, and completing a large puzzle.

The final escape consisted of bigger and harder challenges performed in several stages where everyone on each team is involved and the one who wins each stage would gain an advantage in the next stage.

The show was presented by three different groups of presenters: Caroline Flack and Reggie Yates, JK and Joel, Myleene Klass and Johny Pitts.

Clap your head

This BBC business show was essentially a children's version of The Apprentice

This BBC business show was essentially a children’s version of The Apprentice

This BBC business show was essentially a children’s version of The Apprentice, as viewers saw children compete against adults to create a product for the children’s market.

The Bright Sparks, aka the kids, and The Big Shots, aka the adults, put their product in front of a jury of kids to vote for their favorite, and the team with the most votes won a trophy and a limousine ride. home while the losers took the bus.

The show was not aired until the complainants began to echo how tedious the participants found the recording process.

Show host Saira Khan said she felt more like a scolding teacher than a real colleague, so watching Beat The Boss after school was just punishment.

Dick and Dom in the bungalow

The show was presented by the duo Dick and Dom (Richard McCourt and Dominic Wood)

The show was presented by the duo Dick and Dom (Richard McCourt and Dominic Wood)

Who would not like to see children drenched with shaving cream, vanilla cream and chocolate sauce?

Saturday morning has never looked so good when the kids played games that included everything from roulette-style food games to fun competitions that involved the kids and dancing with pants-on-their-heads.

Presented by the duo Dick and Dom (Richard McCourt and Dominic Wood), the points were earned through success in various games during the show, including “Bogies!”, Which featured children placed in a quiet public place such as a museum or restaurant with alternating shouts of “wagons!” to gradually increasing volumes and puppetry.

The first and second prizes were usually desirable things like a TV or a game console, but the third prize was always an explosive prize like a wheel capsule, carpet cake, hairy cheese or chocolate teapot.

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